21 10 / 2014

feministbatwoman:

huffingtonpost:

Columbia University Student Will Drag Her Mattress Around Campus Until Her Rapist Is Gone

"I think the act of carrying something that is normally found in our bedroom out into the light is supposed to mirror the way I’ve talked to the media and talked to different news channels, etc," Emma continues in the full video which you can watch here. 

So, I just want to go into HOW MUCH Columbia and the NYPD has failed, and revictimized, Emma Sulkowitz.

In her school hearing, Sulkowitz ” had to explain to the three administrators on the panel how anal rape worked. She told them she had been hit across the face, choked and pinned down, but, she said, one still seemed confused about how it was possible for someone to penetrate her there without lubricant. Sulkowicz said she had to draw them a diagram.”

"Her best friend was meant to be at the hearing; Sulkowicz had chosen her as her one “supporter.” But her friend was kicked out of that role for talking about the case, according to Sulkowicz, in violation of the university’s confidentiality policy. As punishment, her friend was also put on probation and made to write two reflection papers: one from the perspective of Sulkowicz and another from the accused."

FROM THE PERSPECTIVE
OF HER FRIEND’S RAPIST

- Two other women at Columbia have accused this guy of sexual assault/rape. But he’s been found not responsible in all instances, and is still on campus

- When she went to the police, one officer said: “”You invited him into your room. That’s not the legal definition of rape.”

- Another officer told her friends, who came with her: ““For every single rape I’ve had, I’ve had 20 that are total bull——,” he added. “It’s also my type of job to get to the truth. If that means being harsh about it, that’s what I do.”

And that’s.
Why.
People.
Don’t.
REPORT.

I want to set literally everything on fire.

(via djhfrotsfd)

21 10 / 2014

"Women aged 15-44 are more likely to be maimed or die from male violence than cancer, traffic accidents, and war combined."

Feminist talk at Students For Liberty’s 2013 Austin Regional Conference (via frowp)

(Source: thecheekylibertarian, via behind-these-dark-brown-eyes)

21 10 / 2014

wnslw:

I want this on a shirt

wnslw:

I want this on a shirt

(Source: freckledshins, via behind-these-dark-brown-eyes)

21 10 / 2014

ghost-royalty:

Reminder to everyone that it’s cooling down and winter is on it’s way, which means people with seasonal depression / SAD associated with cold and winter are going to start showing symptoms. Remember to support your friends instead of shrugging it off as something that “happens every year”

(via elizabethsweave)

20 10 / 2014

mrs-420:

LETS TALK ABOUT THIS FOR A FUCKING MINUTE.

(Source: offensiveheritage, via hominemquaero)

20 10 / 2014

co-gi-to:

untamedcomets:

This is important

IMPORTANT. BOOST.

(Source: adventuringasnotagrownup, via thisvirtualreality)

19 10 / 2014

light-through-the-night:

If you were raped, it wasn’t your fault.

If you were hit, it wasn’t your fault.

If you were molested it wasn’t your fault.

If you were abused in any way, it wasn’t your fault.

I don’t care WHO abused you  or WHY, it wasn’t your fault.

It wasn’t your fault.

(via ed-free-maggie)

19 10 / 2014

lilbijou:

lilbijou:

the statistic is NOT “1 in 3 native women will be raped in their lifetime”

the real statistic is “1 in 3 native women will be raped AT LEAST ONCE in their lifetime”

this is a very important distinction to make please make it known im serious. also its worth noting that 70% of our rapes are carried out by colombus’ crew aka white men. murders also happen more at the hands of white men. this is all important information and im pissed it was ignored in that photoset

(via rapeculturerealities)

19 10 / 2014

19 10 / 2014

selfcareafterrape:

I don’t know how to explain what that means anymore than I know why pretty much everyone knows the feeling.
It isn’t a migraine- but every sound is grating, every touch, everything. For people with PTSD, this feeling often comes right before or after a panic attack. I’ve learned over the years though that it isn’t something only people with mental illness experience.
Things you can do:
        1. Cocoon yourself. They make weighted blankets, and if you experience this often enough(and have the cash to shell out for them)- they’re pretty cool. But if not, get as many blankets as you can and wrap yourself in them. You want a solid, stable sensory experience.  For whatever the reason, the weight helps slow down the racing heart and may even allow you to sleep.
           2, Take a shower in the dark.  Take a night light or something like that in there with you- if you won’t be able to do it in the total dark. Make sure everything is as quiet as possible, and then either take a shower or bath in the dark. I prefer almost too hot water myself. Showers in the dark are great for sensory input, because turning off the lights makes you pay more attention to your other senses, and you get physical, auditory, and smells too.
      3. Going in public? Wear a jacket. If you can avoid over heating in one- that is. Wearing a jacket will help add sensory input- and keep your nerves from picking up every stray accidental touch/whisper of the wind. Also carrying a grounding object in your pocket that you can rub/squeeze can help.
     4. Plank. Or really- any sort of thing that puts strain on a lot of muscles. Personally I like holding push up position, or doing downward dog. You probably don’t want to be doing something that requires you to move/touch too many different things- which is why you want things that put tension, but require you to remain relatively still.
       5. Joint Compressions. Start with your your shoulders- work your way down to your fingers. and then from the hips own the leg to the ankle. They advise doing each joint three times. A lot of children who have nerve issues are advised to get special brushes (they have soft bristles- and lots of them) so that they brush along their arms and legs in order to help calm them down.
       6. Beanie babies or other weighted dolls. Once again, this is something I learned from working with children. I’m not sure why it works, but it has. It’s probably that the weight provides a more solid sensory input- and the fact that it is a doll- it can also be a comfort toy of sorts.

selfcareafterrape:

I don’t know how to explain what that means anymore than I know why pretty much everyone knows the feeling.

It isn’t a migraine- but every sound is grating, every touch, everything. For people with PTSD, this feeling often comes right before or after a panic attack. I’ve learned over the years though that it isn’t something only people with mental illness experience.

Things you can do:

        1. Cocoon yourself. They make weighted blankets, and if you experience this often enough(and have the cash to shell out for them)- they’re pretty cool. But if not, get as many blankets as you can and wrap yourself in them. You want a solid, stable sensory experience.  For whatever the reason, the weight helps slow down the racing heart and may even allow you to sleep.

           2, Take a shower in the dark.  Take a night light or something like that in there with you- if you won’t be able to do it in the total dark. Make sure everything is as quiet as possible, and then either take a shower or bath in the dark. I prefer almost too hot water myself. Showers in the dark are great for sensory input, because turning off the lights makes you pay more attention to your other senses, and you get physical, auditory, and smells too.

      3. Going in public? Wear a jacket. If you can avoid over heating in one- that is. Wearing a jacket will help add sensory input- and keep your nerves from picking up every stray accidental touch/whisper of the wind. Also carrying a grounding object in your pocket that you can rub/squeeze can help.

     4. Plank. Or really- any sort of thing that puts strain on a lot of muscles. Personally I like holding push up position, or doing downward dog. You probably don’t want to be doing something that requires you to move/touch too many different things- which is why you want things that put tension, but require you to remain relatively still.

       5. Joint Compressions. Start with your your shoulders- work your way down to your fingers. and then from the hips own the leg to the ankle. They advise doing each joint three times. A lot of children who have nerve issues are advised to get special brushes (they have soft bristles- and lots of them) so that they brush along their arms and legs in order to help calm them down.

       6. Beanie babies or other weighted dolls. Once again, this is something I learned from working with children. I’m not sure why it works, but it has. It’s probably that the weight provides a more solid sensory input- and the fact that it is a doll- it can also be a comfort toy of sorts.

(via selfcareafterrape)